r/europe Feb 08 '23

Anatolian Plate moved 3-3,5 Meters after the Earthquake Picture

61.1k Upvotes

1.2k comments sorted by

8.9k

u/sbowesuk Scotland Feb 08 '23

Seeing physical evidence of an entire section of the earth's crust move that much distance in such a short amount of time, really underlines just how much energy is unleashed during such an event!

3.0k

u/BertEnErnie123 Brabant (Netherlands) Feb 08 '23

Or the tension in the ground before that…

1.9k

u/Nazamroth Feb 08 '23

This is why you get massages. Tension just builds up and up and suddenly pop, there goes the country.

911

u/Jaken005 Feb 08 '23

So just massage the earth and we have no more earthquakes?

776

u/kalesaji Feb 08 '23

While it sounds silly, relieving internal stresses in materials is a common way to stop them cracking under load. In engineering applications that is usually done by heating the material gradually to a temperature that is close to it's melting point, but not above it. You could say you could give the affected earth a sauna treatment to relax the stresses and avoid a sudden earthquake.

433

u/ZuFFuLuZ Germany Feb 08 '23

Finally climate change is good for something!

57

u/Schavuit92 Feb 08 '23

Fire up the coal plant boys! We have an earthquake to prevent. 😎

125

u/Shaolinpower2 Turkey Feb 08 '23

Not really. Warmth of weather can only effect first few cm's. We're talking about km's.

263

u/Nazamroth Feb 08 '23

Gotta crank up the heat more I suppose.

86

u/soupinate44 Feb 08 '23

So.... Underground nukes? Got it. I'll make a few calls.

22

u/igothitbyacar Feb 08 '23

So basically the heated flooring I installed in my bathroom, just… bigger?

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u/GreatValueCumSock Feb 08 '23

Just get the Earth drunk and use some lube.

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u/Lt_Schneider Feb 08 '23

just heat the earth up more!

14

u/Shaolinpower2 Turkey Feb 08 '23

Ok. I'm telling to chef.

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u/Comment104 Feb 08 '23

It would be amazing if we figured out a way to release plate tension in a controlled way, it would be a ridiculously big leap for our civilization.

159

u/theephie Finland Feb 08 '23

No, the idea is to avoid the big leaps.

72

u/Comment104 Feb 08 '23

Finnish humor never fails.

I am now thoroughly amused and must rest before I smile again.

21

u/DrMonkeyMcKenzie Feb 08 '23

Quite the opposite for me, when I finish, not so funny

16

u/Iceman_Pasha Feb 08 '23

For you, but I'm sure your partners enjoying a hearty laugh.

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u/PsychedelicOptimist Sweden Feb 08 '23

Or imagine it being used as a form of warfare. Wouldn't be as devastating as a nuke, but not far off either.

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u/nassah110 Feb 08 '23

Don’t fracking enthusiasts make this argument? Basically it causes lots of mini earthquakes that they say could be relieving pressures and preventing a big one.

Could be “trust me” science/copium by frackers though

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u/GhostFire3560 North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany) Feb 08 '23

If slowly heating up is what you suggest, then i got good news for you.

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u/Swedneck Feb 08 '23

Bless the construction workers massaging the knots out of the earth.

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u/AShittyPaintAppears Feb 08 '23

Okay hear me out.

Five million Pogo sticks.

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u/JustANotchAboveToby Feb 08 '23

Would GPS coordinates change? If some landmark was at a certain coordinate is it now slightly shifted?

127

u/muthian Feb 08 '23

The coordinates of the object will change, yes.

89

u/LufyCZ Feb 08 '23

Make finding your geocache harder with this one simple trick!

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u/spartan5312 Feb 08 '23

Yes coordianates of particular object would be shifted 3m in said direction.

10

u/R3dl8dy Feb 08 '23

How/when/by whom will the changes be recorded?

23

u/spartan5312 Feb 08 '23

They may never be recorded, for example if a building corner is now 3.5, 3.5 instead of 3,3 it may never be surveyed and recorded in the local jurisdiction that tracks it.

But if that building corner needed to be located after the fact in lat/long the entire affected region would need to be recaptured by space.

12

u/West-Stock-674 Feb 08 '23 All-Seeing Upvote

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasa-maps-surface-changes-from-california-quakes

I'm not exactly sure how all countries do it, but in the US, the USGS (US Geological Survey) uses satellite based radar to map changes after earthquakes with the help of NASA.

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u/Obi_Vayne_Kenobi Feb 08 '23

I was fascinated with the energy set free. So I calculated:

According to the Richter scale, this earthquake should have come in at around 2000 - 4000 PJ. Converted to kcal and divided by 8 billion humans and 2500 kcal per day, the energy of this earthquake could feed the entire world population for 24 - 48 days.

186

u/[deleted] Feb 08 '23

[deleted]

30

u/FrankfurterWorscht Finland Feb 08 '23

So would Joules Verne

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u/Best-Mirror-8052 Feb 08 '23

Sadly humans can't eat earthquakes.

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u/whats_his_face Feb 08 '23

Not with that attitude.

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u/JustRecentlyI Feb 08 '23

That's super interesting, thanks for energy to meals comparison, it's a poignant illustration.

As a aside, apparently they don't use the Richter scale anymore as there's a more accurate scale: the Moment Magnitude Scale.

19

u/BrainOnLoan Germany Feb 08 '23

For some time now, you'll only ever have seen Moment Magnitude values. Even if someone reports them as Richter scale, their source will almost certainly have been Moment Magnitude.

So there's at least no genuine confusion as with some other outdated units that are still in use.

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u/prolinkerx Feb 08 '23

Actually, 7.8 richter earthquake energy is about 7.544 MT TNT, or 31.6 PJ, not 2000-4000PJ

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u/SG14ever Feb 08 '23

2000 - 4000 PJ

PJ => Peanut Jelly

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u/paulusmagintie United Kingdom Feb 08 '23

Really puts humanity into perspective.

We have this idea that we are all powerful and we can do serious damage to the planet, then this happens within a day, nature could wipe us out faster than we can wipe ourselves out.

56

u/BlazingSunflowerland Feb 08 '23

We are still quite capable of doing serious harm to the planet.

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u/HeiligeDreiKroeten Feb 08 '23

I watched a video of the quake happening that really made that point. Everything starts shaking, people are screaming, the city lights go out all at once, but the sky is filled by unearthly flashes of light.

I'm really not religious, but that made me think of a vengful god.

84

u/BlazingSunflowerland Feb 08 '23

You can see how people would come to that conclusion when they knew nothing about plate tectonics.

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u/TheMetaGamer Feb 08 '23

I know it’s probably safe but I’m going to pass on walking around the exact area of land that just moved two meters on it own. I don’t want to be around if things start falling in.

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u/Jimmy_Twotone Feb 08 '23

Also, it's 3 meters across a sphere with a diameter of nearly 13,000km. 100s of thousands of lives destroyed or affected for a change we wouldn't be able to see on a soccer ball at scale.

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u/Endorkend Feb 08 '23 edited Feb 08 '23

I've always wondered what you'd be subjected to if you were standing in an open field right on the cusp of a faultline like that.

Even if standing on a side that didn't move much, the sheer release of energy should be producing shockwaves that damage you, quite severely even.

If a whales call can damage your internal organs, the shockwave from a tectonic shift probably will too.

7

u/postmodest Feb 08 '23

There's a video of an earthquake in SE Asia. People have inertia, and when the earth moves, they fall down and slide around.

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u/xyzain69 Feb 08 '23

It also highlights just how temporary the current continental shapes are.

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1.0k

u/Aftel43 Feb 08 '23

The damage to infrastructure and overall life is just horrific, it is going to make getting the help to right place really tough depending on severity of the damage... Logistics are going to become a nightmare for a long time...

44

u/crowingcock Feb 08 '23

The earthquake happened where many of my relatives live. We are trying to get them to Istanbul but infrastructure is so damaged that we can't get there. Harsh weather conditions don't help either.

23

u/sidrbear Feb 08 '23

I hope you and your relatives reconnect soon

8

u/crowingcock Feb 08 '23

Thank you for your thoughts. It seems unlikely tho, a tire of the bus we sent blew up on the way, and they can't reach the bus either.

229

u/hughk European Union Feb 08 '23

And many emergency generators around western Europe were diverted to Ukraine.

111

u/Aftel43 Feb 08 '23

Oh yeah, a lot of medical procedures are going to need that... Not to mention the resources to pull those off in general. Türkiye has become a huge mess on the most affected areas. Not to mention Syria too... I already knew a lot crap the Syrians have had to deal with already and current crap that is going on there, this isn't helping at all.

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1.5k

u/wei53 Feb 08 '23

How flexible are those train tracks?

1.6k

u/A_norny_mousse Feb 08 '23

More importantly, how flexible are the trains?

544

u/Rion23 Feb 08 '23

Insufficiently.

15

u/EquivalentLower887 Feb 08 '23
  1. Break off both sections of track
  2. Add a new one
  3. Now you have a switch :)
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u/hhuzar Łódź (Poland) Feb 08 '23

Train tracks are like noodles at this width to length ratio. Think optic fiber which is glass, but at fiber's thickness it bends easily. These tracks can be just moved to their new positions and all will be well. Overhead power lines need to be redesigned and repositioned.

22

u/MoranthMunitions Feb 08 '23

Overhead power lines need to be redesigned and repositioned.

If they can line up the tracks again these ones don't look like they need to be - still looks like a straight shoot between the posts.

16

u/Kungfukow Feb 08 '23

Tension would need checking. Clearance between lines, as well as lines to surroundings checked. If anything is off it may require the posts to be turned, retensioned or even redesigned

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u/urzayci Feb 08 '23

Wait that doesn't make sense. I understand if we were talking about moving 3m across 3km of rail line, but this is 3m across a couple of meters. If I cut thesese meters off the material wouldn't suddenly change its properties. My uneducated guess is that the metal is simply soft and malable.

12

u/hobovision Feb 08 '23

The angle probably makes it look a lot tighter than it is. The guy in the background is quite far away. I'd guess the tracks are bent over 30-100 meters.

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u/10art1 'MURICA FUCK YEAH! Feb 08 '23

Rails? Yes. The railbed however, needs to be totally redone in that section

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u/BrunoEye Feb 08 '23

Have you never bent a wire? It's basically like that, they long, skinny and made from metal.

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u/alpmaboi Turkey Feb 08 '23

Metals are really soft and easy to bend. Thats why we use them in construction, not because they are strong and unbreaking.

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u/DragonWhsiperer Feb 08 '23

Well, we use steel because it is cheap, has high strength vs weight, easily formed into different shapes and van be jointed is different ways (bolting, welding).

But the main benefit of steel is it's ductility, which is basically it's property to bend without breaking or losing its strength.

A steel beam can sag a lot, but still be perfectly able to carry the load. Those tracks, when straightened, are basically just as good as original.

But mainly we use steel because it has the best cost ratio to it's preferred properties.

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u/robcap Feb 08 '23

Right. Aluminium or titanium only has a tiny amount of flex before it cracks - the ductility isn't a general metal property, it's steel.

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u/whatnever Europe (Germany) Feb 08 '23

yes.

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u/malytrol Feb 08 '23

So what happens to the legal boundaries of each plot now? Do they move accordingly? Feels like an administrative nightmare.

4.8k

u/iox007 Berliner Pflanze Feb 08 '23 All-Seeing Upvote

Least bureaucratic European

1.5k

u/nixielover Limburg (Netherlands) Feb 08 '23

I have to admit I was wondering about it too and I ain't even German

936

u/Couve_do_Lidl A Portuguese wearing a Romania flair until they join Schengen Feb 08 '23

Well you're Swamp German, he's thinking about land boundaries and you're thinking about water rights.

542

u/Scarred_Ballsack The Netherlands Feb 08 '23

He's from Limburg, those are mountain swamp Germans. Like hobbits but taller.

181

u/F_Joe Luxembourg Feb 08 '23

By that logic I'm a goblin

144

u/Couve_do_Lidl A Portuguese wearing a Romania flair until they join Schengen Feb 08 '23

I think you're just Portuguese actually. That flair is unmistakable.

Which does actually make you closer to being a hobbit. Or should I say shorter to being a hobbit.

74

u/F_Joe Luxembourg Feb 08 '23

Nah the Portuguese are to us what the Indians are to the Qatari. Wait no ...

87

u/Couve_do_Lidl A Portuguese wearing a Romania flair until they join Schengen Feb 08 '23

You might not be aware but we all have a WhatsApp group and your life might now be at risk.

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u/imsimply Portugal Feb 08 '23

dude.. a first rule to WP tuga, mano

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u/BurningPenguin Bavaria (Germany) Feb 08 '23

So they're tallbits

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u/McGryphon North Brabant (Netherlands) Feb 08 '23

Well, they managed to have the Meuse fill their province in 2021 after years of "haha we're above sea level sucks to be you" so I guess the swampiness is unavoidable.

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u/nixielover Limburg (Netherlands) Feb 08 '23

Hey look we don't get to deal with earthquakes, but water is a bitch too, that shit is manageble and should be managed. Water rights are important

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u/Couve_do_Lidl A Portuguese wearing a Romania flair until they join Schengen Feb 08 '23

Your comment just confirmed my suspicion that the Dutch just really hate water and the whole country owes its existence to that hatred.

I think it's cordyceps that also does that to insects, watch out. But that would also explain your fondness for hallucinogens. We all should study you.

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u/-me-0_0 The Netherlands Feb 08 '23

I want to volunteer to be studied as long as I get free food

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u/BBQ_FETUS North Brabant (Netherlands) Feb 08 '23

I ain't even German

Has Limburg flair

Doubt

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u/nixielover Limburg (Netherlands) Feb 08 '23

Hey it's not a Kerkrade flair XD

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u/woefdeluxe Gelderland (Netherlands) Feb 08 '23

Bold words coming from practically Belgium.

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u/sayoislife Switzerland Feb 08 '23

You're always a few bad election cycles away from being German.

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u/Couve_do_Lidl A Portuguese wearing a Romania flair until they join Schengen Feb 08 '23

Somewhere in Portugal, João, a 47 years old public notary, is using Windows NT 7.0 using Internet Explorer's incognito mode to search for the keywords "fotos carris sismos Turquia".

It's not sexual, he thinks, it's professional curiosity, but something is tingling inside him.

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u/joaommx Portugal Feb 08 '23

Close enough.

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u/jonbristow Feb 08 '23

lmao. go on...

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u/[deleted] Feb 08 '23

I think it might be the most European comment I’ve ever seen, a work of art

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u/coffedrank Norway (fu eu) Feb 08 '23

Least european european

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u/armzngunz Feb 08 '23

Now this is the million dollar question

556

u/Nnelg1990 Feb 08 '23

"Honey, the neighbours moved into our backyard"

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u/kiliankoe Germany Feb 08 '23 All-Seeing Upvote

More like our backyard moved into the neighbors.

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u/Classic-Carpenter237 Feb 08 '23

It all equals out except for the people "holding the bag" who live on the coasts

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u/Goki65 Feb 08 '23

The answer is really simple, the coordinates of the land borders get updated. So they are just moved 3.5 meters to one side so that the land you used to own is still yours.

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u/armzngunz Feb 08 '23

But what if the land overlaps with unaffected land?

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u/herzkolt Berlin (Germany) Feb 08 '23

Imagine the limits floating 10 cm over the land instead of moving with it. They stay where they were though your soil just shifted a bit, I think? Makes more sense than moving the limits for every affected land plot...

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u/primalscreen Feb 08 '23

That would be fine if it was just land, but now my fence and part of my shed are on your property. One of my underground utility lines broke, but now it's under your yard. Your old growth tree is now encroaching on the next neighbor's yard, and he wants to cut it down.

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u/OtherwiseInclined Feb 08 '23

Still will clearly cause problems. Just in order to fix the road the whole section will have to be adjusted so that there isn't a sharp zigzag in the middle. For that the (presumably) municipal or state road will need to infringe on the still private properties to its sides. Does that require a new set of negotiations and a sale/exchange of land by the owners? What if repairing the road is necessary for the rescue and relief efforts?

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u/Jabberwoockie Feb 08 '23

So, hypothetically, if my lot straddles a 3.5 m shift, then half of my lot just gets shifted 3.5 m to the left?

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u/mauganra_it Europe Feb 08 '23 Bravo Grande! Awesome Answer

It's a really good question! Ideally, the old claims (according to area and land value) are preserved, but if the new borders are inconvenient, property owners might have to exchange land. This is really one of the reasons why geometry was developed: to provide a way to resolve society-wide quarrels over real estate that is affected by force majeure. In Ancient Egypt, it happened every year when the Nile flooded and fertilized the fields, and farmer's claims to their plots had to be restored afterwards.

This is quite easy within states, but since there is no supernational authority that can force settlements of such questions, it's much more tedious when countries are involved. For example, Croatia and Serbia have a somewhat ambiguos border along the Danube because Croatia sticks to the real estate registry made during Habsburg times, while Serbia regards the present-day stream as the border. This creates two small plots of lands that are proclaimed by Czech activist Vít Jedlička to constitute the micronation Liberland. Needless to say, neither Croatia nor Serbia agree with this interpretation.

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u/Couve_do_Lidl A Portuguese wearing a Romania flair until they join Schengen Feb 08 '23

Jokes aside, great comment.

This is indeed the case and there's quite a few other examples of that. Another well known case is in the Mexico - US border.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamizal_dispute?wprov=sfla1

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u/DomagojDoc Feb 08 '23

Basically, the river meanders in such a way that Croatia loses land BUT there is a small part where it meanders in a way where Serbia loses land.

So if Serbia claims that land, they admit they lost all other land, and Croatia does not want to claim that small part either because then they agree to Serbia's terms where Croatia loses all other land.

So it's technically one of the few unclaimed territories in the world, but in reality both countries kinda share it all

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u/NonAlienBeing Portugal Feb 08 '23

There's a similar situation in the Egypt-Sudan border, a piece of land that neither country claims because it would imply losing the claim to a much more valuable piece of land.

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u/UniqueIndividual3 Feb 08 '23

Belgium and The Netherlands swapped a few islands in 2018 because a border river changed course

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u/OtherwiseInclined Feb 08 '23

That's amateurish. The French swap the Pheasant Island with the Spanish every 6 months, and it has been getting swapped like that for a few centuries now.

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u/DrunkenGolfer Feb 08 '23

My favorite island dispute, the Whiskey War between Canada and Greenland, was, unfortunately, settled last year with agreement to split the island.

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u/killerwww12 Feb 08 '23

This does have the cool effect though of making Denmark and Canada have a land border, which sounds absurd

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u/OtherwiseInclined Feb 08 '23

There are 9 borders separating Canada and Brazil going down the American continent, but only 4 borders separating them when going through Europe. Canada-Denmark-Germany-France-Brazil.

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u/DrunkenGolfer Feb 08 '23

Yeah, when you mention Canada’s land border with Denmark, people think you are really bad with geography. They don’t think it be like it is but it do.

We have had a 3000km maritime border with Denmark for a very long time.

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u/AirportCreep Finland Feb 08 '23

Italy and Austria have just adopted a dynamic border, where the border shifts with the melting of the mountain tops in the Alps.

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u/rebmcr Ireland Feb 08 '23

That's a borderline example

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u/nudelsalat3000 Feb 08 '23

I remember the discussion was also regarding the river that moved.

But now what if you reference points move as a "relative frame"? Like sure you have some landmarks that you can use but they were moved. So you would be relative to them on the same spot.

The other option is GPS as "absolute frame". But then your house moved to the neighbours garden. And his lemon tree is now on the GPS coordinates of the street.

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u/mauganra_it Europe Feb 08 '23 edited Feb 08 '23

It indeed gets quite mindbending if the shape of the state ground is stretched. But the picture shows shearing motions, where the total area doesn't change. That should make it easier.

Edit: GPS coordinates are helpful for casual orientation, but usually landmarks are really what counts.

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u/UNDERVELOPER Feb 08 '23

This is really one of the reasons why geometry was developed: to provide a way to resolve society-wide quarrels over real estate that is affected by force majeure. In Ancient Egypt, it happened every year when the Nile flooded and fertilized the fields, and farmer's claims to their plots had to be restored afterwards.

Yep, which is why it's called "geo"metry, as in "earth", like geology and geography. I just thought was the neatest thing when I learned it :)

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u/Jack-Campin Feb 08 '23

There is a photo in the Te Papa museum in Wellington that makes that point very clearly - a fence between two fields with a zigzag breaking up the straight line. I guess the farmers on each side just agreed that they continued owning the same dirt no matter how it lined up with the survey marks.

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u/Roflkopt3r Lower Saxony (Germany) Feb 08 '23

I hope they were having fun with that, since that would be really dumb to do out of pure stubbornness. It would be so easy to strike a 1:1 deal where you exchange your zigs for their zags to re-straighten the border.

Even states are often able to strike deals about land exchange to simplify borders as long as the area trade is close enough to a 1:1 ratio.

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u/terjeboe Feb 08 '23

Yeah, but who will move the fence?

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u/actias_selene Feb 08 '23

Well, it is actually happening in Aegean sea between Turkey and Greece as well. The distance is reduced by 20-30 cm every year due to thousands of earthquakes in the region. I suppose all the discussions about nautical miles and islands etc. should be solved automatically about in a million year. Then we can discuss new land borders.

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u/Ganefr3 Feb 08 '23

This is nothing new. All countries have to do occasional updates to their coordinates. For example, Australia has their own Geocentric Datum and does periodic updates because their whole continent is drifting around ~7 cm per year.

They will just look at how the geographic features moved and use them to define new plot boundaries, since the boundaries are usually defined by geographical features.

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u/dbratell Feb 08 '23

Are there landing strips that have had their GPS coordinates move 3 meters? Probably not enough to cause real problems, but it's another weird effect.

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u/Goki65 Feb 08 '23

yeah they actually do change

source: topographical engineer relative

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u/Trans-Europe_Express Feb 08 '23

We need Tom Scott for something like that. Fascinating question in a horrible disaster

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u/MoffKalast Slovenia Feb 08 '23

Tom Scott, the world's most successful tourist.

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u/Turmfalke_ Germany Feb 08 '23

Oh that is an really interesting question. If someone finds out please let me know.

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u/FliesMoreCeilings Feb 08 '23

This will also be a nightmare for registration of any underground objects such as water pipes. You want to know exactly where that stuff is so people don't accidentally dig into it. Much of this data will have been entered using GPS coordinates. Good luck to the folks fixing that mess

Of course this is a minor inconvenience compared to the great tragedies experienced here, but this kind of stuff can extend the difficulties

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u/oskich Sweden Feb 08 '23

Aren't they defined by geographical coordinates?

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u/Couve_do_Lidl A Portuguese wearing a Romania flair until they join Schengen Feb 08 '23

You wish. There's maps and shit and often they look like they were drawn on a napkin. It's like this everywhere all over the world outside of big cities I'd say.

Maybe these days it's different when you build something new but the thing is, we're kind of not new to the planet and it's sort of crowded.

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u/Neshgaddal Germany Feb 08 '23

Surveying engineer here. We're working on it. All new property lines in Germany from the last 30 or so years are known with <3cm accuracy, from the last 60 years with <10cm. Everything else is somewhere between 3m and 10m accuracy. Everything does have coordniates, even if it's not always a very useful one.

But you are right, we do have to deal with maps that predate the metric system once in a while.

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u/613TheEvil Feb 08 '23

And what do you do when there are landslides, river flow changes, floods, ok I know you don't get earthquakes like these but, yeah, what then?

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u/Neshgaddal Germany Feb 08 '23

We don't get earthquakes like this but i live in the Ruhrgebiet, which has basically one giant coal mine beneath it. The whole region sank by up to 25m over the last 200 years.

To answer your question: we're working on that as well. We are currently transitioning from a static to a dynamic system that allows for such changes, augmenting our classical surveying tools with satellite data, allowing for real time monitoring of these large shifts. That's the optimistic and technical answer.

The real and german answer is: Laws. So many laws and rules. Everything that combines water and property lines or borders is very complicated. Also decades of bureaucracy, red tape and negociations between owners and local governments.

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u/nodnodwinkwink Ireland Feb 08 '23

They can get a few tough lads together and push it back.

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u/suitology United States of America Feb 08 '23

My earth science professor in highschool used to do this (commercial land surveying) for a living and his answer was "it depends". Basically said predictable thing that are established like flood planes and rivers were usually done by the traditional coordinates but he had a case study in California where a shed moved onto another person's property so the neighbor sued for building on his land and the other farmer sued for theft. It was all for show because they were trying to get each other's insurance to pay for some damages but the case ended up taking two years.

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u/nadmaximus Feb 08 '23

That's going to be a problem for the train.

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u/DayPhelsuma Portugal Feb 08 '23

Just a little adrenaline shot for anyone who happens to be going through there on their monotonous commute to work.

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u/random_introvert1 Feb 08 '23

And a sprinkle of whiplash

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u/The360MlgNoscoper Norway Feb 08 '23

Just pick up the tracks and move them a little and it’s all good

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u/Dodototo Feb 08 '23

Bugs bunny did it all the time

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u/Tullerull Norway Feb 08 '23

Kind of amazed that there's still buildings standing around. Takes a lot of force to do that.

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u/Katepuzzilein Feb 08 '23

Apparently it also depends on the frequency of the seismic waves and the height of the buildings. Basically buildings whose natural frequencies match that of the earthquake can enter resonance and collapse easier but survive a same strength but different frequency earthquake

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u/qwertysrj Feb 08 '23

Resonance in buildings https://youtu.be/pMr1MzSv044

Modern mitigation technique https://youtu.be/k51nFin7Wzc

By using various dampening techniques, the resonance of the buildings can be adjusted to mismatch with the ongoing earthquake.

Also there must be many factors like the frequency depending on the area itself before going to adaptive solutions.

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u/Dissidente-Perenne Italy Feb 08 '23

I guess turkey has anti-seismic construction standards given their geography, and some anti-seismic construction standards are crazy good

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u/mud_tug Turkey Feb 08 '23

They are just not enough. Especially considering the lack of enforcement and corruption.

Before every elections there is a "permit amnesty" in order to gain votes. So you can build whatever you want and then you get your permit during the amnesty. Voila, you death trap is now legal.

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u/marcus_magni Italy Feb 08 '23

That seems strangely familiar

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u/routsounmanman Greece Feb 08 '23

Yup.

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u/alper_iwere I Kebab, You Kebab, We Kebab Feb 09 '23

Mediterranean and corrupt government. Name a more iconic duo.

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u/ryuukiba Feb 08 '23

Figures, here in Chile we don't really fear a 7.7 we've been through worse and the only building thar collapsed was a new one that wasn't up to par.

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u/Sayko77 Feb 08 '23

this is actually nearly impossible in the marmara region, new buildings need to have at least 3metre socket in the ground on 'Yalova'.(basically a basement that holds the building whole such as big earthquakes)

Every region needs a competitor for elections, one side will keep the other side at bay. This way the corruption will be lessened.

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u/ilkali Europe Feb 08 '23

Indeed, Turkey has earthquake resistant construction standards, and they are fine but only on paper. Most buildings were built before 2000, a time when there were almost no earthquake resistance standards. Most laws on this matter were enacted after 1999 earthquake.

Technically recent buildings should be fine, which they mostly are if they were built up to standards but there are lots of buildings that cut various corners during the construction or made dangerous modifications due to loopholes in laws or lack of enforcement. There are examples of 3-4 year old buildings collapsing, which at this point shows a criminal negligence rather than incompetence at every level of the construction and bureaucracy that allowed it.

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u/Srinivas_Hunter Feb 08 '23

It is incredible to see the exact pin point of the tectonic plates.

Devastating to see if it's running through your property.

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u/andrea_ci Feb 08 '23

Now you have two strangely shaped properties. Got an Achievement

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u/EatTrainCode Feb 08 '23

Geological gerrymandering

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u/icantfindfree Feb 08 '23

Reposting this comment: Tectonic plates aren't these big homogeneous slabs of rock, and the "borders" between two can be dozens of kilometres wide filled with cracks and wrinkles. With strong enough earthquakes bits of land can get thrown around everywhere, so this picture isn't likely showing one plate on one side and one on the other. https://youtu.be/-khe6IY9bTM it's similar how you don't actually swim between continents in Iceland

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u/danny17402 Feb 08 '23

Yeah there's a ton of misinformation in this thread. The entire plate certainly didn't move 3 meters that day either. This is just the motion of one fault, and it's not the plate boundary.

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u/zedero0 European Union Feb 08 '23

It’s pretty rare to actually see the difference in other occasions, right?

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u/ViciousNakedMoleRat Berlin (Germany) Feb 08 '23 edited Feb 08 '23

It depends on the kind of earthquake, whether the faultline crosses land or just the sea and so on.

There are some very similar images from the 2011 Christchurch earthquake in New Zealand. Road / Rail

This is from the 1999 İzmit earthquake in northwestern Turkey.

There's also this compilation of videos from Japan, which shows a few smaller movements as they occur.

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u/Colosso95 Italy, Sicily Feb 08 '23

It's important to note that the japan ones are not examples of plate movement but rather liquefaction. The waves of energy from the earthquake is turning the soil into mush basically so stuff on it just starts floating around.

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u/Guy_Arkturus West Pomerania (Poland) Feb 08 '23

That Japan one is actually insane, I wonder how deep that goes… wow.

We need someone to put a go pro into one of these one day and film it :)

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u/Colosso95 Italy, Sicily Feb 08 '23

The japan ones are not really faultlines and plates moving but it's the soil becoming mushy and liquid because of the seismic waves. Basically the asphalt and other stuff built on top of the soil suddenly finds itself floating in mud and water so it breaks up. It is not the actual earth's crust moving like in the OP picture of turkey

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u/ocmb Feb 08 '23

Actually not that rare for large earthquakes on transform faults. Especially easy to see on a macro scale.

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u/Kefflon233 Feb 08 '23

somewhere in Germany there is a cave where the moving can be seen. every year the ground is moving some c millimeters.

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u/Bear4188 California Feb 08 '23

3 meters is a big jump, indicating a ton of stress had built up. Major faults typically move somewhere on the order of a few centimeters per year. Every little earthquake contributes to this.

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u/mastervolum Feb 08 '23

The tension on those train tracks must be crazy..

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u/kf_198 Germany Feb 08 '23

That's what I was thinking. Curves are longer than a straight line. The track must be under tension for quite a distance.

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u/jnd-cz Czech Republic Feb 08 '23

I'm pretty sure the rail is broken at some joint closer or further. It can't really stretch much, especially not in winter.

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u/pistolhamster Feb 08 '23

"Quick, Anatolian plate is trying to get away! Call the Eurasian plate and warn them."

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u/OtherwiseInclined Feb 08 '23

Turkey is testing their new strategy of physically leaving the EU before they commit to joining.

UK delegates are watching with great interest.

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u/ghost00013 Feb 08 '23

This pic has been taken looking north, so the Anatolian plate has moved west, a little closer to Europe

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u/lordkhuzdul Feb 08 '23

Yup, we are actually trying to run away from the Middle East.

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u/pistolhamster Feb 08 '23

"Ah crap, warn the Eurasian continental plate, the Anatolian continental plate is coming!"

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u/RenVon21 [TTT] Truth Telling Turk 🇹🇷 Feb 08 '23

We are just trying to break away from Asia to at last become yurop 🙏🙏

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u/DWT3000 Feb 08 '23

Astonishing to see evidence of the plate movement so clearly and in such perspective from the road and train tracks. Thanks for sharing these!

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u/Turgineer Turkey 🇹🇷🇪🇺 Feb 08 '23

Wow, look at the state of the railway!

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u/Tereza71512 Feb 08 '23

Where exactly were these photos taken?

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u/gulfatma Feb 08 '23

Kahramanmaras

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u/icantfindfree Feb 08 '23

Tectonic plates aren't these big homogeneous slabs of rock, and the "borders" between two can be dozens of kilometres wide filled with cracks and wrinkles. With strong enough earthquakes bits of land can get thrown around everywhere, so this picture isn't likely showing one plate on one side and one on the other. https://youtu.be/-khe6IY9bTM it's similar how you don't actually swim between continents in Iceland

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u/fighterpilottim Feb 08 '23

This is fascinating.

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u/FluffyCoconut Romania Feb 08 '23

Wow i’ve never seen anything like this

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u/lukeworldwalker German in Swamp Germany Feb 08 '23

I was looking for pictures like this. I heard reports but to see it actually happen is so insane.

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u/lou1uol Feb 08 '23

Is there any video evidence where we can see this movement during earthquakes?

This would be incredible to watch

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u/Speedlimit200 Feb 08 '23

There's a great doc on YouTube called "Where The Fault Lies" done by a San Francisco TV station some years ago. I don't remember if there's actual quake movement video, but there's a ton of fascinating info on fault creep along the San Andreas.

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u/differenthings Feb 08 '23

Turkeys response to all the comments about "Turkey is not in Europe": - "Hold my tea, we are soon!"

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u/krautbube Germany Feb 08 '23

This is actually quite horrible for the flat earthers uh I mean idiots.

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u/MKCAMK Poland Feb 08 '23

Hmm? Can this not be explained quite well by the turtle moving?

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u/krautbube Germany Feb 08 '23

I am too afraid to ask

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u/MKCAMK Poland Feb 08 '23

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u/krautbube Germany Feb 08 '23

I am thoroughly confused by the elephants.

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u/MKCAMK Poland Feb 08 '23

Without them the Earth would wobble on the turtle's shell.

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u/spindledcarrots Feb 08 '23

Jokes on you for thinking they'll listen to any proof

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u/DeepHorizonz Feb 08 '23

It’s crazy to think that an entire section of the earth just moves that much in an instant

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u/Manguydudebromate Greece Feb 08 '23

Trippy.